Thinking Outside the Criminal Justice Box: Exploring Alternative Models of Justice – Prisoners’ Families and Friends Service

Thinking Outside the Criminal Justice Box: Exploring Alternative Models of Justice

Sarah Lamble, Lecturer in Law, Birkbeck College, 15 May 2012

The latest addition to our programme of continued professional development evenings is a talk by Sarah Lamble, Lecturer in Law at Birkbeck College, on Tuesday 15 May 2012 at 6.30pm. Refreshments will be available.

The title of her talk is “Thinking Outside the Criminal Justice Box: Exploring Alternative Models of Justice”.

Sarah completed a Bachelor of Arts in Cultural Studies at the University of Trent, Canada, a Masters in Criminology at the University of Toronto, and a PhD in Law at the University of Kent, Canterbury. Sarah has taught courses in politics, law, criminal justice and gender and sexuality studies and has published articles on a range of topics including: community responses to violence, welfare and penal policy, and social movements struggles around imprisonment. Sarah has more than 10 years experience as a community organizer on issues of poverty, imprisonment and violence prevention work in the Canadian and UK contexts.

The venue for the evening is our office at 20 Trinity Street, London SE1. The event is free to our volunteers and prisoners’ families. Others are welcome, but a charge of £5 applies.

(Published 6 March)

via Thinking Outside the Criminal Justice Box: Exploring Alternative Models of Justice – Prisoners’ Families and Friends Service.

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Northwest Herald | Imprisoned hearts: Families of those serving time are crime’s forgotten victims

Kassie Kennedy remembers the first time she visited her fiancé, Jason Gedzyk, at the Taylorville Correctional Center.

She made the 250-mile drive down to the minimum security prison in Taylorville, with Gedzyk’s mother, Judy, of Crystal Lake.

It was a busy day at the prison, so the pair had to park far away from the visitors’ entrance and run through a full-on central Illinois summer downpour to reach the doors.

At that time, in September 2008, the two had very limited knowledge of what it would take to actually get inside to see Jason, but they hadn’t laid eyes on him since the day he was sentenced.

About six weeks earlier, a McHenry County Circuit Court judge sentenced the then 27-year-old to six years in the Illinois Department of Corrections on an aggravated driving under the influence conviction.

The accident was covered by local media outlets, and the story of the victim and his family was told.

What was not covered was the story of what happened to Gedzyk’s family after the gavel hit the sounding block.

The sadness, guilt, depression and shame felt by Gedzyk’s mother, sister and fiancée.

The hundreds of dollars a month that would be required by the family from then on to maintain ties with Jason and support him while he was away.

The stigmatization that comes with being related to someone who is incarcerated.

The day Jason Gedzyk was sentenced, in many ways, his family was sentenced, too. And they, like the hundreds of other innocent people living in McHenry County who have a loved one in prison, pay for the crimes of those loved ones, in some way or another, every single day.

During January and February, the Northwest Herald spent time interviewing two Department of Corrections inmates who once called McHenry County home, and several families who have a loved one who is behind bars.

On Aug. 13, 2006, Gedzyk drove home from a going-away party his friends had thrown him at a local bar. He had earned a job as a bartender on a cruise ship and was due to leave the next day.

via Northwest Herald | Imprisoned hearts: Families of those serving time are crime’s forgotten victims.